1. xlrecordings:

    JACK WHITE - LAZARETTO. The new album, 9 June on XL / Third Man Records.

    (via r3d)

     
  2. Just relax…

    credit: /u/Aaragon

     
  3. corealiscreative:

    Ira Glass | The Gap (Advice)

    To all of you new designers who are wet behind the ears, just starting off in your careers. Listen to this advice, it might be the best bit you’ll ever get.

    via: vimeo

    Yes. Yes. Yes.

     
     

  4. "I pictured how people play, one hand holding the train strap. When you play game on a smartphone, the simplest way is just tapping."
    — Dong Nguyen, on designing Flappy Bird (via maxistentialist)
     

  5. "One of the first items sold on [eBay] was a broken laser pointer for $14.83. Astonished, Omidyar contacted the winning bidder to ask if he understood that the laser pointer was broken. In his responding email, the buyer explained: “I’m a collector of broken laser pointers.”"
    — 

    eBay - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (via lauraolin)

    The internet, ladies and gentlemen.

    (via mikerugnetta)

    (via kenyatta)

     

  6. "According to Matt Groening, [John] Swartzwelder used to write [Simpsons] episodes while sitting in a booth at a coffee shop ‘drinking copious amounts of coffee and smoking endless cigarettes.’ When California passed an anti-smoking law, Swartzwelder bought the diner booth and installed it in his house, allowing him to continue his process in peace."
    — Wikipedia, John Swartzwelder (via maxistentialist)
     
  7. kenyatta:

    Every airline flight in the world over 24 hours

    via airtrafficlive and washpo

    Wow, such flights. Much awesome!

    (via khuyi)

     

  8. tonistarkofwinterfell:

    LIFE HACK IF SOMEONE IS REALLY EXCITED ABOUT SOMETHING TRY TO BE EXCITED FOR THEM OR AT LEAST PRETEND TO BE AT LEAST SLIGHTLY INTERESTED BECAUSE NOTHING FEELS WORSE THAN EXPRESSING SOMETHING THAT MAKES YOU HAPPY ONLY TO HAVE PEOPLE TELL YOU TO CALM DOWN OR IGNORE YOU COMPLETELY

    (via maxistentialist)

     

  9. "My underlying concerns in the book are issues that I struggle with in my own life: How do you do meaningful creative work while also earning a living? Is it better to devote yourself wholly to a project or to set aside a small portion of each day? And when there doesn’t seem to be enough time for all you hope to accomplish, must you give things up (sleep, income, a clean house), or can you learn to condense activities, to do more in less time, to “work smarter, not harder,” as my dad is always telling me? More broadly, are comfort and creativity incompatible, or is the opposite true: Is finding a basic level of daily comfort a prerequisite for sustained creative work?"
    — 

    Daily Rituals: How Artists Work by Mason Cure

    A book detailing the daily routines of people like Kafka, Wolfe, Karl Marx, Agatha Christie, Woody Allen, Dickens, Picasso, Gershwin? Yeah, I’m sold. Just got bumped to the top of the list.

    As someone who, no matter how busy, is constantly inspired to fiddle with some side project but finds too many excuses to dive deep enough, this topic is important to me. And if Anthony Trollope could write 3,000 words every morning before leaving for work at the Post Office, where he held a job for 33 years while writing more than 2 dozen books, then what’s my excuse?

     
  10. This is a gosh darn terrific presentation. Bravo.

     
     

  11. "The moment that you feel that, just possibly, you’re walking down the street naked, exposing too much of your heart and your mind and what exists on the inside, showing too much of yourself. That’s the moment you may be starting to get it right."
    — 

    Neil Gaiman’s Commencement Speech at the University of the Arts, 2012

    Was reminded of this in an email from Tim Ferriss today, referencing his incredibly honest "Productivity" Tricks post from last month. It doesn’t get much more inspiring than that!

     

  12. "The safe (simple agreement for future equity) is intended to replace convertible notes in most cases, and we think it addresses many of the problems with convertible notes while preserving their flexibility. In addition to being simpler and clearer, we intend the safe to remain fair to both investors and founders."
    — 

    Paul Graham - YCombinator Announces safe, an Alternative to Convertible Notes

    Haven’t read any of the documentation yet, but knowing YC’s propensity to innovate their “product” to find a happy medium between investors and entrepreneurs, I’m excited about this!

     

  13. maxistentialist:

    Cards Against Humanity’s “$5 More” Black Friday Sale

    A lot of people have been curious about how our “everything costs $5 more" Black Friday sale worked, and if it was successful for us.

    We initially started talking about doing a Black Friday sale over the summer, and came up with the idea of a “$0.01 off” coupon. I liked the idea, but have always maintained a policy of no deals, no discounts, and no sales  for Cards Against Humanity, even during our Kickstarter. To me the game is always $25, it’s never another price, and doing any kind of deal or discount undermines the simplicity and honesty of the game.

    Execution

    Nothing crazy here. I put together a landing page and we replaced all the “buy” buttons on our site with the new pricing. I edited the FAQ to include:

    Why do all of your products cost more today?

    We’re participating in the tradition of “Black Friday,” an American holiday celebrating a time when the Wampanoag tribe saved the settlers of Plymouth Colony with incredible deals. All of our products are $5 more today only, so you can enjoy buying them that much more.

    I’m mad that you’re making a joke about Black Friday.

    You’re probably a bad person.

    Reception

    The sale made people laugh, it was widely shared on Twitter and Tumblr, and it was the top post on Reddit. The press picked it up, and it was reported in The GuardianUSA TodayPolygonBuzzFeedAll Things DChicagoist, and AdWeek. It was even the top comment on The Wirecutter’s front page AMA, which had nothing to do with us.

    I was pretty sure that our fans would be into the “$5 more” sale, but I had no idea that it would turn a day where we’d normally be totally overlooked into a huge press hit for the game.

    Sales

    So how did we do? A little better than last year. We kept our position as the best-selling toy or game on Amazon. My guess is that peoples’ buying decisions just weren’t that affected by $5.

    The interesting thing to note is that we got a nice lift in our sales the day after Black Friday (“Regret Saturday”). That might be from people who were waiting to buy the game until it came back down in price, or, more likely, those are sales from people who heard about the game after our Black Friday press. Not bad for an ad that paid us to run it.

    This is just terrific. Was equally stoked on Everlane’s Blackout for Black Friday stunt last year. We had shut down our site on Thanksgiving this year because, well, it’s just ridiculous that people were getting up from family meals early wait in line at Walmart to get a “deal” on a TV they didn’t want or need in the first place.

    But Cards Against Humanity really pulled off a winner here with a campaign that was as simple and clever as their product. Brilliant!

    (Source: maxistentialist)

     
  14. Uber continues to impress me with their execution of these increasingly less-frivolous marketing “stunts.” From Mariachis to Kittens to Santas to Trees, these buzzworthy events are becoming more and more useable. I guess that’s the settling of Travis Kalanick’s “Lifestyle + Logistics” vision.

    The things that impress me the most beyond the concepts are the strategy of the right partners (Home Depot, Cheezburger Network, etc), the right emotion (kittens + animal shelters, Christmas cheer on-demand…) and the right timing (National Cat Day, Cinco de Mayo, holiday season).

     

  15. "I think how you treat your struggling investments says more about you than how many billion dollar exits you have had. You need both to be successful in the VC business, of course. The latter metric defines your selection acumen. The former defines your empathy acumen. And when I pick people to work with, I look for the latter."
    — The more I live and the more I learn, the more I see the power of empathy across all facets of life. And it’s always great to see it displayed and valued by a man as successful as Fred. Of course, to his point, that success is likely—at least partially—a result of his empathy.

    Sticking with the Struggling Investments - AVC